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Advocacy

IOMS Legislative Update

Download a copy of the June 2015 End of Session Legislative Update

Find Your Legislator

 

How to Read a Bill

Legislation does one of three things: creates a new act, adds to existing statutes, or deletes a portion of existing statutes. If the bill creates a new act, it will state this in the first line of the bill: “This is an Act to create…”. It is important to know this because as you read the bill all of the language in the bill is new language. If the bill is adding new language, the new language is underlined. If the bill is deleting language, the language to be deleted has hash marks through it. Let me know if you have questions about this.

 

New Legislation

For the next several weeks, legislators will be busy introducing legislation. As each bill is introduced, I will read it to determine if it could have any impact on the IOMS membership and send it to you as a member of the IOMS Legislative Committee to review. Please let me know if you support, oppose, or monitor this legislation. In addition, I always need know the “why” behind your decision.

Below please find the first bills for you to review and recommend that IOMS supports, opposes (and why), or monitors. Also let me know if you want additional information on any bill.

  • House Bill 120 (full text)—Provides that all health insurance plans must provide coverage for intravenous feeding and for enteral or tube feeding.
     
  • House Bill 122 (full text)—Provides that accident and health insurance policies and managed care plans must provide coverage for intravenous feeding, prescription nutritional supplements, and hospital patient assessments.
     
  • House Bill 125 (full text)—Removes a provision requiring the Department of Healthcare and Family Services to impose limitations on prescriptions drugs such that the Department shall not provide reimbursement for more than 4 prescriptions, including 3 brand name prescriptions, for distinct drugs in a 30-day period, unless prior approval is received for all prescriptions in excess of the 4-prescription limit; and removes certain exemptions to the 4-prescription limit.
     
  • House Bill 127 (full text)—Requires the Department of Public Health to establish a 3-year pilot program for the Chicago school district in which the Department shall require an electrocardiogram (EKG) test as part of the health examination that student athletes are required to undergo.
     
  • House Bill 184 (full text)—Requires the Department of Public Health to establish and conduct a public education program to inform pregnant women and women who may become pregnant regarding cytomegalovirus.
     
  • House Bill 207 (full text)%mdash;Creates the Right to Try Act. Provides that an eligible patient with a terminal illness who has considered all other treatment options approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration may acquire from a manufacturer an investigational drug, biological product, or device that has successfully completed Phase 1 of a clinical trial, but has not been approved for general use by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Provides that the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation may not revoke, suspend, place on probation, reprimand, refuse to issue or renew, or take any other disciplinary or non-disciplinary action against the license or permit of a physician to practice medicine based solely on the physician’s recommendation to an eligible patient regarding, or prescription for, or treatment with an investigational drug, biological product, or device.
     
  • Senate Bill 7 (full text)—Sets forth provisions concerning the prevention, treatment, and oversight of concussions affecting student athletes instead. Requires the governing body of each school district and charter school with students enrolled who participate in an interscholastic athletic activity to appoint or approve a concussion oversight team. Requires each concussion oversight team to establish a return-to-play protocol.
     
  • Senate Bill 8 (full text)%mdash;Requires each licensed health care professional who performs a physical examination of a person 19 years of age or younger to include as part of that examination questions that evaluate the person’s family history related to various cardiac conditions.
     
  • Senate Bill 12 (full text) – Provides that HFS and other departments to annually recalculate rates and reimbursements paid to providers or vendors that do business with or are under contract with the Departments.
     
  • Senate Bill 29 (full text)—Creates the Right to Try Act. Provides that an eligible patient with a terminal illness who has considered all other treatment options approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration may acquire from a manufacturer an investigational drug, biological product, or device that has successfully completed Phase I of a clinical trial, but has not been approved for general use by the United States Food and Drug Administration.
     
  • Senate Bill 54 (full text)—Includes breast tomosynthesis in the definition of “low-dose mammography”.
     
  • Senate Bill 62 (full text)—Creates the Epinephrine Auto-Injector Act. Provides that a health care practitioner may prescribe epinephrine auto-injectors in the name of an authorized entity where allergens capable of causing anaphylaxis may be present.

 

Meeting with Your Public Officials

A face-to-face meeting with an elected or appointed official, or with the official’s aide who handles the issues of importance to you, is often the best way to voice your concerns. Meetings with your member of Congress can take place in the member’s state or district office or in Washington, D.C. Meetings with state legislators can take place at the state capitol or in their districts. Meeting with local officials can be more informal, taking place at a neighborhood function or county courthouse. Here are some tips for meeting with your public officials:

  • Make an appointment and arrive on time.
  • Arrive prepared with the facts about the issue you wish to discuss. Contact IOMS for talking points on issues related to Osteopathic Medicine in Illinois.
  • Be brief and specific about the purpose of your meeting.
  • Whenever possible, provide an alternative to the issue you’re address. It’s much more powerful than just saying ‘this won’t work’.
  • Have support materials (e.g., articles) available to leave with your representative.
  • Follow up your meeting with a short thank you note. It provides another opportunity for you to state your message.

 

Legislative Links

State of Illinois
Illinois Governors Office
Illinois General Assembly
Illinois State Board of Elections
Find your State Legislator
Illinois Department of Finance and Professional Regulation
Illinois Department of Human Services
U.S. Library of Congress THOMAS Legislative Search
U.S. Senate
Find your Senator
U.S. House of Representatives
Find your Representative (U.S. House)
The White House